In a recent interview with Fusion, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said that his country is "much more secure than 4 years ago."

Santos, who has been in office since 2010, is running for reelection on May 25, and said that Colombians should vote for him because under his administration the country has arrived at a point where there is finally a good chance of achieving peace between the government and the left wing FARC guerrillas.

"I hope that nobody is indispensable to achieve peace, and I'm not indispensable, but what I'm saying is this is a very complex process that has been built with extreme care for many years," Santos said. "You don't improvise in a process like this."

Santos' government has been in peace talks with the FARC guerrillas since October of 2012. Both parties have already agreed on a framework that would allow the rebels to enter civilian politics. But disagreements on the conditions under which the guerrillas will give up their weapons, and how victims of the five decades long armed conflict will be compensated for their losses still remain.

As the negotiations progress the FARC continue to attack police stations and oil pipelines in Colombia, angering conservative groups who have accused Santos of being too lenient on the rebel group.

Santos' opponents also claim that the president's security record is not as bright as it first seems.

Under Santos' watch, Colombia has been able to chip away at its high kidnapping rates and its murder rate, which has dropped by around 20 percent since 2010.

On the other hand, the number of attacks staged by the FARC guerrillas against infrastructure continues to be the same around the country according to a recent report, and some cities, like the strategic port of Buenaventura have seen a significant spike in violence, caused by turf wars between drug trafficking groups.

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