10 Directors Who Could Take on Star Wars Episode 7

PHOTO: The Oscar-nominated Mexican director has always had a deep love for monsters, zombies, vampires, and creatures that lurk in the darkness.

Courtesy of Universal Pictures

Everyone seems to have an opinion as to what the next Star Wars episodes should look like on the big screen. With Disney's purchase of Lucasfilm for $4 billion, there's a lot at stake, and plans have already been set to release the first film in the new trilogy in 2015.

Now all the franchise needs is the right director to take what George Lucas started to the next level. The first of the rumored directors to be meeting with George Lucas is Colin Trevorrow, the man behind one of our favorite indies this summer, Safety Not Guaranteed, starring Aubrey Plaza.

But our friend and cinephile Jack Rico at ShowbizCafe.com has some different ideas – 10 in fact – of Latino and Spanish directors who could do the next films justice.

Rico's carefully curated wishlist runs the gamut of no-brainers like Mexico's Guillermo Del Toro, to guys who still have something to prove and could become established overnight via something like this, such as Chile's Nicolas Lopez and Uruguay's Fede Alvarez - both of whom appeared on our own Directors To Watch in 2012 list.

Check out his picks:

10. Nicolas Lopez (Chile)

This young Chilean who created a Star Wars fight scene in his first feature length comedy, Promedio Rojo, and is now in post-production with his first English-language earthquake thriller with Eli Roth and Selena Gomez called Aftershock, is just getting his feet wet in Hollywood. We think with a few years of experience and Hollywood wisdom under his belt, he could be a credible consideration to direct one of the three, if not, one of the many chapters Disney has prepared. His love for Star Wars is evident in his feature film and it is that type of ardent zeal that can get him a potential meeting with Disney executives.

9. Paco Cabezas (Spain)

Imagine a found footage version of Star Wars shot with a handheld camera? That's exactly what Spaniard director Paco Cabezas would do, stylistically, if he were behind the lens. Cabezas, who will be directing Mr. Right written by Max Landis (Chronicle), and who made noise around the film festivals with his sophomore comedic thriller, Neon Flesh, believes that a youthful approach to the series, with young Jedis, would give it a more modern and refreshing feel for today's audience. His knack for visual effects, a gritty tone, and a comedic bite, make him a great candidate to redefine the episodes to a more contemporary time.

8. Nacho Vigalondo (Spain)

With movie titles like Extraterrestre and Los Cronocrímenes you know that you're in for a man who loves the sci-fi genre. Spaniard helmer Nacho Vigalondo has the talent to get behind the camera of the Star Wars series and bring some thrills and excitement that Lucas himself couldn't bring in his last three chapters. Known for his sci-fi comedy twists in his Spanish language movies, Vigalondo, like Lucas, is a screenwriter, one who can provide a refreshing and smart take on the vapid Lucas dialogue of old and sure to impress former and new fans of the series.

7. Alex de la Iglesia (Spain)

When someone describes you as a combination between Guillermo del Toro and Peter Jackson you know you are destined for some sort of greatness. Looked at as a potential director for the Doom movie adaptation with Arnold Schwarzenegger back in the 90's, Álex de la Iglesia is considered a Spanish auteur with a dark/comedic/sci-fi sensibility. His first short, Mirindas Asesinas, impressed Pedro Almodovar enough to fund his first feature film, Acción Mutante, that takes place in the future. Also, one of his last films, The Last Circus, possesses complex characters and a visual darkness that can inject substance to a franchise looking for a shot in the arm. The sky is the limit with Iglesia who has the talent to impress Disney executives if given a shot.

6. Robert Rodriguez (Mexican American)

Rodriguez is an interesting choice for Star Wars. He can do almost anything - from kids movies (Shorts), to grisly fare (Sin City, Machete, Planet Terror) to a sci-fi flick (Spy Kids franchise). He's a master of visual effects on a budget, who loves grit, dark comedy and is known for adding Latino actors to mainstream roles. He would definitely have a Latino Jedi, which might send some fanboys panties in a roar, but then again look at Puerto Rican thespian Jimmy Smits. He played Senator Bail Organa in Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith. It'd be different and current. The question is whether he wants to do it and if he thinks he can pull it off. It'd be a bit of a stretch for him, but not out of his realm. If he goes with "Latinizing" the franchise, he has to ponder if he wants to deal with the barrage of fan questions for his tinkering with its universe. If he sticks to a Hollywood format and like he did in Sin City, he could pull it off and be hailed as a box-office elite director.

5. Ricardo de Montreuil (Peru)

After directing two Spanish-language feature indie films to mixed reviews, De Montreuil was propelled onto the Hollywood spotlight by a short he directed in 2010 titled The Raven. This futuristic sci-fi thriller, about a man who possesses a dangerous telekinetic power, is the stuff of visionary and accomplished directors. The short is so well crafted that 20th Century Fox reportedly had him direct Mexican actor Gael García Bernal in a screen test for the new reboot - Zorro Reborn - slated for 2014. The toughest thing to do in the science fiction genre is to be able to combine exceptional storytelling with intricate visual effects, and De Montreuil is blessed with the faculty to do both. Even the great Ridley Scott couldn't pull it off in this year's highly anticipated Prometheus. If given the chance, De Montreuil could become a tour de force.

Peep the list in its entirety here and tell us: who's your pick to direct Star Wars 7?

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