PHOTO: Dogs in pantyhose -- a most self-explanatory fad

Shaming Pets: Dogs in Pantyhose

Ulatang on Weibo.com, via Kotaku.com

"Dogs in pantyhose" is more than just a terrible stain on your online search history. It also happens to be the latest online fad in China. The "gou gou chuan siwa" phenomenon, as Kotaku describes it in a post that helpfully includes a warning to readers who may find photos of dogs in pantyhose offensive, kicked off when "bored" people began posting pictures of their dogs in various states of undress to Weibo, a Chinese social networking site. Heels and expressions of shame and/or apathy are optional, but highly encouraged. This fad is, of course, dumb and it is silly. It also happens to be just the latest in a long stream of memes dedicating to embarrassing poor, defenseless pets.

Dog Shaming
I mean, duh, right? This is really the Platonic ideal of embarrassing animal memes. And what are Tumblr and Reddit for, really, if not for one, sharing pictures of pets, and two, gently mocking something?
PHOTO: Get a room, dogs.
Cats with Bread
What happens when you stuff a cat's face through a slice of bread? You will probably lose an eye, and you'll end up with a super silly picture perfect for sharing on Tumblr.
PHOTO: Cats + bread. Mustard optional.
Beedogs
"Beedogs.com is the premier online repository for pictures of dogs in bee costumes." Truth.
PHOTO: Whats better than animals? Animals dressed as other animals.
Texts From Dog
This dumb dog can't even use punctuation when he texts. How embarrassing for him!
PHOTO: LOL, Dog.
Animals Doing People Things
These animals think they can do things like eat with their hands or have disappointing birthday parties or be a cool bro when really all they do is walk around naked.
PHOTO: Animals, you aint people.
Animals Being D***s
These animals have a bad attitude and probably deserve to be shamed on the internet.
PHOTO: Fact: Animals are mega jerks.
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