Stuart Seeger

For at least the third-consecutive year, Oregon saw the highest percentage of inbound moves among all 50 states, according to a report from mover United Van Lines.

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With 69% of its total moves inbound, the Beaver State easily topped runner-up Nevada, which rung up an inbound rate of 59%. Washington came in third at 56%.

Of moves to Oregon, a new job or company transfer comprised 53%, while wanting to be closer to family 20% led the reasons for most inbound moves, United said.

Meanwhile, New Jersey, topped the list of states with the most outbound moves, with a rate of 66%. It's at least the third-consecutive year New Jersey topped the list. The Garden State was followed by New York (65%) and Illinois (63%).

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Here's the map:

United Van Lines

California had the most overall inbound moves at 13,670. But it also had 13,045 outbound moves. Washington DC had the most population-adjusted inbound moves at 101 per 100,000 residents, followed by Colorado and Oregon.

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“This year’s data reflects longer-term trends of people moving to the Pacific West, where cities such as Portland and Seattle are seeing the combination of a boom in the technology and creative marketing industry, as well as a growing ‘want’ for outdoor activity and green space,” Michael Stoll, economist, professor and chair of the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles, said in a release. “The aging Boomer population is driving relocation from the Northeast and Midwest to the West and South, as more and more people retire to warmer regions.”

On a population-adjusted basis, Oregon still came out on top, with a net of 39 inbound moves for every 100,000 residents.  The top 5 for that group is as follows:

  1. Oregon
  2. District of Columbia
  3. California
  4. South Carolina
  5. Idaho

And the bottom-5:

46.  Kansas
47.  New York
48.  Illinois
49.  New Jersey
50.  Connecticut

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The study was based off of more than 248,000 total moves for 2015.

Rob covers business, economics and the environment for Fusion. He previously worked at Business Insider. He grew up in Chicago.