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Maybe once, as a child, you thought to yourself, "If I cut this piece of money into two pieces, will it just be worth half as much money?" In Canada, your childhood fantasy is a reality. People in Quebec's Gaspé region have taken to cutting their $20 bills in half to make two $10 bills, and the Canadian government's like, "Yeah, that sounds good."

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To their credit, Canada's central bank is frowning on the practice. "The Bank of Canada feels that writing and markings on bank notes or mutilating them [is] inappropriate as they are a symbol of our country and a source of national pride," Bank of Canada spokeswoman Josianne Ménard told the CBC. Goddamn right it is, Josianne.

It's still technically legal, though, and Canadian businesses apparently like it because it creates a "commitment to local businesses" because only people "in-the-know" can use the money.

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This is so dumb and I understand why everyone makes jokes about Canada now. I'm sad I ever defended your healthcare and polite manners because it was all a sham.

Michael Rosen is a reporter for Fusion based out of Oakland.