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Lady Gaga is set to play the Super Bowl halftime show—a slot that has seen everything from left sharks (ugh) to purple rain (woo!) —this coming Sunday.

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While Gaga has been fastidiously tight-lipped about what she has in store for her performance, some have wondered if the infamously outspoken pop star will use the Super Bowl stage to protest against President Donald Trump, about whom she has been an unapologetic critic.

At a press conference on Thursday, Gaga showed a few cracks in her (ahem) poker face (oh god I'm so sorry) and teased what viewers could expect.

“The only statements that I’ll be making during the halftime show are the ones that I’ve been consistently making throughout my career,” Gaga explained. “I believe in a passion for inclusion. I believe in the spirit of equality, and that the spirit of this country is one of love and compassion and kindness. My performance will uphold those philosophies.”

And just what sort of statements has Gaga made in the past? Well, she's slammed Trump as "one of the most notorious bullies" in history.

She's protested outside his home at Trump Tower

And, in what is likely the sharpest blow to Trump's voracious need for attention, once declined to talk about him at alltelling a BBC interviewer that she had "nothing to say" about the then-candidate.

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Speculation about whether or not Gaga would use her performance to drag the president was fueled in part by reports that the NFL had specifically asked that she not "say anything or bring anything up about the election, or mention Donald Trump," according to an anonymous source who spoke with Entertainment Tonight.

A spokeswoman for the NFL later dismissed the allegation as "unsourced nonsense from people trying to stir up controversy where there is none."

So what does Gaga hope to accomplish with her Super Bowl performance? Nothing short of harmonious nationwide coexistence.

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"I don’t know if I will succeed in unifying America,” Gaga said at her press conference. “You’ll have to ask America when it’s over."

Oh, OK.