love can conquer hate

The Beastie Boys’ response to hateful graffiti will give you hope

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A park named after late Beastie Boys member Adam Yauch was defaced with swastikas and pro-Trump graffiti. So the band asked fans to “rally to stand against hate” at the park in Brooklyn today and hundreds of New Yorkers showed up.

The rally was organized by elected officials and faith leaders. Fans who attended were also greeted by Beastie Boys member Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz, who showed up to say a few words. Billboard describes it as “one of the most electrifying” speeches of the event.

Here’s what he said:

I’m assuming that we’re all here today ’cause we’re thinking the same thing: spray-painting swastikas at a children’s playground is a messed up thing to do … This is about hate crimes towards Muslims soaring to their highest levels since 9/11. We elected a president that is giving our children the message that it’s OK to attack people of color. This is real. We’ve gotta stand up against hate. If you’re able to give money, give to Black Lives Matter. If you’re able to protest, protest. If you’re able to volunteer, volunteer.

If you’re a musician, write that anthem. Take what you’re good at and give to the cause that you care most about. And please keep your eyes open. Stand up for each other. I reject Donald Trump’s mission of America. Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens and Staten, from the Battery to the top of Manhattan. Black, white, New York, let’s make it happen!

Since Donald Trump was elected, the Southern Poverty Law Center has recorded more than 700 instances of harassment around the country. As one of the organizers for the event pointed out, it’s telling that president-elect Trump has tweeted about his future Vice President getting a polite lecture when he attended Hamilton but hasn’t bothered to write a quick message to tell his followers to stop harassing people.

The hateful voices are bringing us closer together rather than tearing us apart though. Today’s rally in Brooklyn was just one of the many events of love and tolerance sparked by petty hate.